Ladugård (barn)

Ladugård (barn) at Gammelgarden Museum

Ladugård (barn) at Gammelgarden Museum

Photo by:Carol Seefeldt Photography

The present Ladugård (barn) was constructed in 1879 at the request of Rev. Eric Hedeen. When the property was sold to the Nelson family in 1884, the barn was listed on the deed. The hitching posts were removed from the perimeter of the cemetery and the front of the church when roads were widened and paved. The lower level of the barn was for livestock, the upper level for tools, crops and vehicle storage.

In the Ladugård you will see many artifacts from the early immigration era to the civil war era. Your tour guide can show you many of the early tools used by settlers to harvest their crop, catch fish, build furniture, feed livestock and harvest ice. Be sure to check out the chart of wood so you will know what wood to use on your next project!

Ladugård (barn) at Gammelgården Museum

West wall of the barn features a furniture makers work bench for the 1860's. A skilled furniture maker/wood worker was an asset to the immigrant community and his skills were quickly sought. The bench was quickly made and on the underside the boards still have the bark!. Items in this display include broad axes ( one used to build the GammelKrykan in 1856), wood clamps, augers, assorted saws, planes and hammers. Donated by Clarence Nelson, grandson of the bench owner/maker.

Ladugård (barn) at Gammelgården Museum

Yes, wood was the most common and accesable resource for the immigrants. It paralleled what they knew in Sweden. As each immigrant searched for their perfect piece of property to settle on, they were "reading" the landscape- here are Tamarack trees for building timbers (they never rot!), here are Basswood for hand carving items, Ironwood for tool handles and furniture, Oak for construction, furniture, good firewood and wool dye, Birch trees for weaving strips to make baskets, shoes and fences (and liquor!), Pine trees for construction timbers and pitch- They would also look for a water source, prevailing wind patterns, water flowage patterns and animal tracks/trails.

Ladugård (barn) at Gammelgården Museum

South Wall features the tools used by the early immigrants-either brought with them or created/purchased in America as needed. Included are grain flails, cradle scythes, grain stack poles, hay knives and a breaking plow. In the background is a fanning mill. Immigrants were encouraged to bring tools to America-but the metal parts only, not the handles; handles required too much space in the immigrant trunks and new ones could be purchased or made in America.

Ladugård (barn) at Gammelgården Museum

East Wall includes farm tools and machines used after the Civil War when the industrial revolution changed agriculture. These tools would be sought by the adult children of the early immigrants or the newly arrived second wave of immigrants. The display includes a fanning mill, fodder chopper ( later adapted to a gas engine), and corn sheller.

Ladugård (barn) at Gammelgården Museum

Farm Wagon loaded for a trip to town! Having a wagon , and draft animals, was a sign of success and starting to make head-way in America. This enable mobility and commerce-you had things to sell/barter with. This display includes collapsible egg crates, Scandia Coop Creamery cans, and hand made baby buggy wheels. Cord wood was also a trade commodity and made the trip to town profitable. Stopping at the Mercantile could include socializing, collecting mail as well as trading for needed staples. The metal parts of this wagon were brought from Sweden, the wheels were made locally.

Ladugård (barn) at Gammelgården Museum

North Wall displays nesting boxes for the chickens, which were highly sought after for meat, eggs and feathers, and grain and crop samples. Can you identify corn, oats, rye, barley, hay and straw? Also included is an oat storage bin made by Axel Almquist in the 1860's. Raising grain to harvest was the first challenge; the second challenge was safe storage of the grain from rodents and mold. Part of this display was constructed by Eagle Scout Cody Kendrick in 2007.